Sitting Volleyball

Table of Contents

Sitting volleyball is a fast-paced, challenging and exciting sport that has gained popularity among people with disabilities. This sport, similar to traditional volleyball, involves two teams of six players who play a high-speed game while sitting on the floor. While it may seem easy, sitting volleyball requires a high level of athleticism, endurance, and skill, making it one of the most challenging para sports. 

 

In this comprehensive guide, we will explore the history of sitting volleyball, the rules and regulations, and the skills required to play this exciting sport. Whether you are a seasoned player, a coach, or just starting to learn about sitting volleyball, this guide will provide you with the knowledge and insights you need to take your game to the next level.

 

What is Sitting Volleyball?

Sitting volleyball is a variation of the sport of volleyball that is specifically designed for athletes with disabilities. It was created in the early 1970s as a way for disabled athletes to participate in the sport of volleyball, and since then it has become one of the most popular para sports in the world.

 

Sitting volleyball is played by athletes who are seated on the floor and use their upper bodies to hit the ball over the net. The sport is fast-paced and requires a high level of skill and coordination, making it one of the most challenging para sports.

 

In this comprehensive guide, we will take a closer look at the history, rules, and techniques of sitting volleyball, and what makes it such a unique and exciting sport to watch and play.

 

The History of Sitting Volleyball

The origins of sitting volleyball can be traced back to the early 1970s, when the sport was first developed as a way for disabled athletes to participate in the sport of volleyball. The first international competition for sitting volleyball was held in 1974, and since then the sport has grown in popularity and has become one of the most popular para sports in the world.

 

One of the key factors that has contributed to the growth of sitting volleyball is the development of specialized equipment, such as lightweight volleyball chairs, which have made the sport more accessible to a wider range of athletes.

 

Another important factor has been the creation of specialized leagues and tournaments, such as the Paralympic Games and the World ParaVolley World Championships, which have helped to raise the profile of sitting volleyball and increase public awareness of the sport.

 

The Rules and Techniques of Sitting Volleyball

Rules

Court: The court is 9 meters by 6 meters and the net is lower than a traditional volleyball net, at 1.15 meters for men and 1.05 meters for women.

 

Teams: Teams consist of six players, with three in the front row and three in the back row.

 

Serve: The serve must be done while sitting, and the ball must cross the net within the antennae. If the ball goes out of bounds, the serve goes to the opposing team.

 

Blocking: Blocking is allowed, but players must keep at least one buttock in contact with the floor.

 

Attacking: Attacking is allowed, but players must keep at least one buttock in contact with the floor.

 

Defense: Players can dig, set, and pass the ball using their hands and arms, but they must keep at least one buttock in contact with the floor.

 

Scoring: A rally point system is used, with a match consisting of five sets. A team wins a set by having 25 points and leading by two points.

 

Substitutions: Teams can make unlimited substitutions, but they must be made while the ball is not in play.

 

Faults: Faults include touching the net, carrying the ball, double hitting, going out of bounds, and not keeping one buttock in contact with the floor.

 

Techniques

Serve: Players should focus on serving accurately, using a variety of serves such as overhand, underhand, or jump serves.

 

Blocking: Players should learn how to anticipate the attacker’s shots and position themselves to effectively block the ball.

 

Attacking: Players should focus on attacking with power and accuracy, using techniques such as jumping and spiking.

 

Defense: Players should learn how to dig, set, and pass the ball quickly and effectively.

 

Communication: Communication is key in sitting volleyball, as players need to communicate with their teammates to coordinate their movements and defend against their opponents.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, sitting volleyball is a challenging and exciting sport that is perfect for athletes of all abilities. It combines the speed, agility, and teamwork of traditional volleyball with the added challenge of playing while sitting. With its growing popularity and increased recognition as a competitive para sport, there is no doubt that sitting volleyball will continue to grow and evolve in the coming years. Whether you’re a seasoned player or just looking to try something new, sitting volleyball is a great choice for anyone looking for a fun and physically demanding sport. So why not give it a try and see for yourself what makes this sport so special?

David Campbell

David Campbell

"I live and breath volleyball"

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